WeHo Architecture Tour

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

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Photographic Exhibition of Historic Properties at the West Hollywood Library, March 25 to mid-May

 WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage 

‘WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage’ is part of ‘WeHo@30’, a series of arts and culture projects celebrating West Hollywood’s 30th Anniversary of Cityhood, featuring photos taken by photographer Tony Coelho and was curated by Current & Historic Preservation and Arts & Economic Development staff of the City of West Hollywood with guidance from the Historic Preservation Commission. 

Subsequently, as part of the WeHo@30 Film Festival: A Digital Time Capsule, the project was doubled in scope and turned into a mobile friendly GIS Map. Please view it here! http://arcg.is/1KXwL4S 

West Hollywood’s heritage is a rich inheritance of traditions, attributes, and cultural resources. Architectural heritage includes much more than preserving, displaying, or restoring a collection of historic buildings. It is both tangible and intangible. Ideas, stories, and other elements of who we are and how we identify ourselves are essential to the understanding of our place.

Preserving West Hollywood’s architectural heritage is integral to the growth of West Hollywood. Designated historic properties embody great significance of the cultural and social fabric of the City. Through historic preservation, we are able to tell stories of times that preceded Cityhood and of people, events, and ideas that embrace the vibrancy of this young city.

Embracing West Hollywood’s architectural heritage is an important contemporary movement that is simultaneously local and specific, global and shared.  

The City of West Hollywood invites you to take part in celebrating its 30 years of Cityhood through its architectural heritage as exhibited in this collection. The photographic exhibition represents a wide array of architectural styles and associations with well-known architects and builders. These images celebrate West Hollywood’s 30th anniversary and beyond – recognizing our past, present, and future.

The exhibit was on display from March 24 to mid-May 2015 at the West Hollywood Library located at 625 N. San Vicente Blvd during regular library hours (M--Th: 11am-7pm, Fri-Sat: 10am-6pm, closed Sundays). Admission is free and free validated parking is available in the one-story Library Parking Structure.

For more information on historic properties in West Hollywood visit www.weho.org/historic

For more information on exhibits at the West Hollywood Library and other WeHo@30 projects, please visit www.weho.org/arts

   

About the photographer:

Tony Coelho is a Los Angeles based photographer with an educational background in film and LGBT studies.  His works include photographing events for the City of West Hollywood, documenting queer arts and lifestyles, and capturing the urban landscape of Los Angeles. You can see more of his work at www.tonycoelhophotography.com

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Quotes about historic preservation from the Historic Preservation Commission and Staff:

      

“Historic Preservation is a physical and experiential history lesson. It tells the story of the City and allows people to experience a time gone by...from worker cottages in the rail yards to the homes of those who made movies and created Hollywood as a state of mind. Those buildings will live on and will remain standing to allow future generations to see and feel the past.”

- Allegra Allison, Historic Preservation Commissioner

“Simply stated, preserving the past for others to understand and appreciate what came before is an important reason for historic preservation. And, in West Hollywood over the past 30 years it has served to document a changing city. Increased public awareness will help educate the community on the rich historical resources that exist within the city limits and how they may take stewardship in preserving the history of this built environment.”

- Paul J. Rice, Historic Preservation Commissioner

“The importance of preservation stems from the deep connection that people feel with their surroundings, whether that connection be historical, familial, social, cultural, or experiential. The people, events, stories, connections, and experiences that are associated with historic resources are embedded in their makeup and presence.”

- Stephanie Cisneros,  Staff Planner

 

Properties included in this exhibit:

 

La Fontaine, c. 1928

1285 N. Crescent Heights Boulevard

Architect:   Leland Bryant

Architectural Style:   French Revival

Designated in 1991

La Fontaine contributed to the growth of West Hollywood by providing luxurious, high-density multi-family living. The 1920s and 1930s saw the construction of a number of high-density buildings contrasted with low-density, single-family homes.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

The Tuscany, c. 1925

1400 N. Crescent Heights Boulevard

Architect:   Unknown

Architectural Style:   Italian Revival

Designated in 1991, contributor to the Courtyard Thematic District

Courtyard style housing became a dominant housing type during the 1920s and 1930s in Southern California. Courtyard buildings incorporate a partially enclosed outdoor space that individual units share as a common area. Fireplaces, benches, water elements, and landscaping elaborate the courtyard spaces as outdoor living areas.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

Lloyd Wright Home & Studio, c. 1927

858 Doheny Drive

Architect:   Lloyd Wright

Architectural Style:   Modern

Designated in 1992

Originally built as a home and office space for noted architect Lloyd Wright, son of Frank Lloyd Wright, this property continues to be used as an office and studio. The home and studio is an exceptional example of Lloyd Wright’s success at combining wood-frame construction with concrete textile block. This particular concrete block pattern features an interlocking design of stylized Joshua trees.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

9231 Doheny Road, c. 1936

Architect:   Peter Whitehill

Architectural Style:   Streamline Moderne

Designated in 2001

The construction of 9231 Doheny Road coincided with the first major commercial developments on the Sunset Strip. The Streamline Moderne building was one of a few highly characteristic styles that defined the commercial landscape of West Hollywood in the mid- to late-1930s.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

1236 N. Flores Street, c. 1931

Architect:   Max Maltzman

Architectural Style:   Art Deco

Designated in 1992

The four-story apartment building is one of the few remaining, intact examples of the Art Deco style in West Hollywood. The building incorporates detailing indicative of the style, such as vertical elements in repetitive patterns and chevrons.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

Beau Sejour, c. 1928

8320 Fountain Avenue

Architect:   Leland Bryant

Architectural Style:   French Chateauesque

Designated in 1994

The high-quality design for this building was presumed to appeal to members of the motion picture industry migrating to Hollywood from New York City in the 1920s and 1930s.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

El Palacio, c. 1931

8491 Fountain Avenue

Builder:   William R. Hauptman

Architectural Style:   Spanish Colonial Revival/ Churrigueresque

Designated in 1992, contributor to the Courtyard Thematic District

The increasing demand for housing that accompanied the rapid growth of the Los Angeles region in the 1920s and 1930s was well-served by the high density of the courtyard apartment. The incorporation of parking garages within the building also indicates the growing demand of the automobile.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

Romanesque Villas, c. 1926

1301 N. Harper Avenue

Architect:   Leland Bryant

Architectural Style:   Spanish Colonial Revival

Designated in 1992, contributor to the Harper Avenue Historic District

The presence of the growing motion picture industry encouraged the development of elegant apartment buildings that attracted Hollywood stars. The location of the property between Beverly Hills and Hollywood and adjacent to the developing Sunset Strip, created an increasingly attractive residential area in the 1920s.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

Hollywood Riviera, c. 1954

1400 N. Hayworth Avenue

Architect:   Edward H. Fickett

Architectural Style:   Mid-Century Modern

Designated in 2010

Thought of as the “Architect to the Stars,” Edward H. Fickett designed this property as a modern oasis that would attract those seeking Hollywood living. The multi-family building stands as an excellent intact example of post-war courtyard apartment housing.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

The Schindler House, now serving as the MAK Center for Art and Architecture, L.A.,

 c. 1922

835 N. Kings Road

Architect:   Rudolph M. Schindler

Architectural Style:   Modern

Designated in 1992

The building is constructed as a combination of masonry walls with light screen openings to private gardens and courts. The former residence was designed as a cooperative live/work space for two families.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

English Village, c. 1924

1000 Larrabee Street

Builder:   Elmer Mauzy

Architectural Style:   Tudor Revival

Designated in 1993

The Tudor Revival buildings were designed as part of a complex of shops, restaurants and cottages named “English Village.” The development was part of the first sizeable commercial developments along the Sunset Strip that utilized the vista of Los Angeles to commercial advantage.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

Emser Tile Building, c. 1926

8431 Santa Monica Boulevard

Builder:   Bekins Moving Van and Storage Company

Architectural Style:   Gothic-inspired Art Deco

Designated in 1994

The Bekins Moving Van and Storage Company wanted to distinguish itself from competitors by constructing a grandiose building that exemplified their high standards of service. The faintly rusticated first story acts as a base to six stories of vertical Gothic spandrels. The rooftop Emser sign originally help the Bekins Storage sign.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

Sunset Tower, c. 1930

8358 Sunset Boulevard

Architect:   Leland Bryant

Architectural Style:   Art Deco/Zig-Zag Moderne

Designated in 1992

Originally named the Sunset Tower and built as residences, in 1986 the St. James Club of London bought the building and converted it into a posh hotel, later becoming the Argyle. In 2005, the building returned to its original name and remains a hotel. The Sunset Tower is considered to be one of the finest examples of Art Deco architecture in the region. This was once the residence of many Hollywood celebrities, including John Wayne, Howard Hughes, Bugsy Siegel, Marilyn Monroe, and Frank Sinatra.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

El Mirador, c. 1929

1302 N. Sweetzer Avenue

Architect:   S. Charles Lee

Architectural Style:   Mediterranean

Designated in 1992

Architect S. Charles Lee was well-known for the movie theaters he designed throughout Los Angeles and incorporated many of the theatrical and period-revival styles he used in his theaters into his design of El Mirador.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

1140 N. Vista Street, c. 1929

Builder:   Buschelen Building Corporation

Architectural Style:   Spanish Revival

Designated in 1991, contributor to the Plummer Park Apartment Grouping

This building is one of five that constitutes an unusual grouping of shared architectural style and form. The Plummer Park Apartment Grouping was constructed on parcels of land purchased from Col. Eugenio Plummer in 1929, which had been part of the original Rancho La Brea.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

1237 Vista Street, c. 1917

Architect:   Unknown

Architectural Style:   Craftsman

Designated in 2010

The Craftsman bungalow was popular in Southern California residential architecture from 1910 to the mid-1920s. The Arts and Crafts movement represents the first popular wave of modernist influence in American architecture. This single family residence is one of the most pristine examples of Craftsman style architecture in the City.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

La Ronda, c. 1928

1400 Havenhurst Drive

Architect:   Arthur and Nina Zwebell

Architectural Style:   Spanish Colonial Revival

Designated in 1992, contributor to the Courtyard Thematic District

During their decade-long practice, Arthur and Nina Zwebell became well-known for their luxurious courtyard housing designs.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

1224 Flores Street, c. 1928

Architect:   Unknown

Architectural Style:   Spanish Colonial Revival

Designated in 1992, contributor to the Courtyard Thematic District

Courtyard housing reflects Southern California’s mild climatic conditions by extending interior spaces into the outdoors.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

Lotus Apartments, c. 1928

1216 N. La Cienega Boulevard

Architect:   Meyer and Holler

Architectural Style:   Japanese

Designated in 1992, contributor to the Courtyard Thematic District

Courtyard housing in Southern California integrates the desire for individual housing and a common outdoor space within a higher density development.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

El Pasadero, c. 1931

1330 Harper Avenue

Architect:   Arthur W. Hawes

Architectural Style:   Spanish Colonial Revival

Designated in 1992, contributor to the Harper Avenue Historic District and the Courtyard Thematic District

El Pasadero was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1996. Placement on the National Register affords the property owner the honor of inclusion in the nation’s official list of cultural resources.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage

Harper House, c. 1929

1334 Harper Avenue

Architect:   Leland Bryant

Architectural Style:   Spanish Colonial Revival

Designated in 1992, contributor to the Harper Avenue Historic District

The Harper Avenue District reflects significant patterns of growth and settlement in West Hollywood. The location of the district between Beverly Hills and Hollywood and adjacent to the developing Sunset Strip, made it an increasingly attractive residential area in the 1920s. The multi-family form and luxury of period revival styles were new to the West Hollywood community, which, until the 1920s, had been dominated with simple single-family development.

WeHo@30: Young City, Vibrant Heritage